Spring commissioning – cleaning teak

Oil is a simple and easy solution that works very well. The #1 thing to do is keep up the oil treatments so the teak doesn’t begin to weather. I didn’t do a great job of keeping AIR BORN’s teak oiled and as a result I needed to put some extra effort into getting it ‘ship shape‘. If AIR BORN’s teak had been treated with varnish, or ‘a varnish-like product, the job of getting the teak looking good would have taken over a week (best case) or more than two weeks. Because I use oil the task was competed in just over three hours. … More Spring commissioning – cleaning teak

E15 Gas

‘E15’ refers to the percentage of ethanol in the gas. Most of us are using E10 in our cars & trucks. A few weeks ago I discussed outboard motor care and touched on the topic of ethanol in gasoline … More E15 Gas

Wood finishes

Exterior and interior wood, to me, makes a sailboat ‘salty’ and appropriately like, well, a boat. From my early days, when my folks started sailing, a proper boat required some wood showing. When my folks went looking for a family boat a few 100% wood boats were considered (though only for a short time). … More Wood finishes

Anchoring

I just love going for a cruise and finding a quiet cove away from all the other boats. Gunkholing requires an anchor. Here I’ll discuss how I store, launch and retrieve an anchor … … More Anchoring

Do you know the condition of your boat’s deck hardware bedding?

Your sailboat’s deck hardware should have been installed using a bedding compound. (I sadly write ‘should’ as I have worked on boats where there is no evidence that bedding compound was used!) Commonly used are Sikaflex’s 291 and 3M’s 4000 and 4200 (remember, 5200 is for under the waterline applications that will very very very likely never be removed). SPECIAL NOTE: do not use silicone to bed deck hardware! 99.99% of the time silcone has NO PLACE for use in the marine environment! … More Do you know the condition of your boat’s deck hardware bedding?